Tsurugishō Momotarō

Japanese sumo wrestler
1.82 m (5 ft 11+12 in)Weight200 kg (440 lb)CareerStableOitekazeUniversityNihon UniversityCurrent rankSee belowDebutJanuary 2014Highest rankMaegashira 7 (November 2019)Championships2 (Jūryō)
1 (Makushita)
1 (Jonidan)
1 (Jonokuchi)Special Prizes1 (Fighting Spirit)* Up to date as of 29 August 2022.

Tsurugishō Momotarō (Japanese: 剣翔 桃太郎, born 27 July 1991 as Kentarō Abiko (安彦 剣太郎, Abiko Kentarō)) is a Japanese professional sumo wrestler from Katsushika, Tokyo. He is a graduate of Nihon University. His highest rank has been maegashira 7. He won a Fighting Spirit Prize in his debut tournament in the top makuuchi division in September 2019.[1] He is a member of the Oitekaze stable.

Career

He was an amateur wrestler at Nihon University, and although he did not win an individual title he was on the winning team in the Student Yokozuna 2012 championships. He entered professional sumo in January 2014. He rose up the ranks quickly, winning championships in the jonokuchi, jonidan and makushita divisions before slowing down a little and spending eight tournaments in makushita. He won promotion to the jūryō division after the November 2015 tournament, and adopted a new shikona, having previously fought under his family name of Abiko. He wanted a two-kanji name to make it easy to remember, and suggested "Ken" from his own first name, combined with the "shō" suffix common at his Oitekaze stable. However, as "kenshō" is the name used for the prize money awarded after a bout it was therefore unavailable, and he used the reading "Tsurugi" instead.

He took some time to settle in jūryō, recording a succession of 7–8 and 8–7 scores, before suffering a setback in March 2018 with his first double-digit loss score of 4–11. However he recovered to post 11–4 in the following tournament, and in July 2019 he won the jūryō championship with a 13–2 record to earn promotion to the top makuuchi division. He was the eighth member of Oitekaze stable to win promotion to the top division since his stablemaster, ex-maegashira Daishōyama, opened the heya in 1998. He had a strong debut, scoring double-digit wins and staying in contention for the championship with a win over Takarafuji on Day 13.[2] Although he lost his last two matches he was awarded the Fighting Spirit Prize on Day 15. He was promoted to a new highest rank of maegashira 7 for the November 2019 tournament, but could only score 6–9 there. He suffered a left knee injury in January 2020,[3] but competed until the end of the tournament, again scoring 6–9. He entered in March but withdrew on Day 5, with the medical certificate citing a left knee anterior cruciate ligament injury.[4] By the time of the next tournament, held in July 2020, he was back in jūryō. In January 2021 he won his second jūryō championship with a 12–3 record. His stablemate Daieishō won the makuuchi championship in the same tournament. This was the first time that the top two divisions had been won by members of the same stable since Takasago stable's Asashōryū and Tōki in November 2005. This saw him promoted back to the top division for the March 2021 tournament. He returned to jūryō after scoring only 5–10 in September 2021.

Fighting style

Tsurugishō is a yotsu-sumo wrestler, who prefers grabbing the mawashi to pushing or thrusting at his opponents. His favoured grip is migi-yotsu, a left arm outside, right hand inside position. His most common winning kimarite or technique is yori-kiri or force out.[5]

Career record

Tsurugishō Momotarō[6]
Year in sumo January
Hatsu basho, Tokyo
March
Haru basho, Osaka
May
Natsu basho, Tokyo
July
Nagoya basho, Nagoya
September
Aki basho, Tokyo
November
Kyūshū basho, Fukuoka
2014 (Maezumo) West Jonokuchi #12
7–0
Champion

 
West Jonidan #11
7–0
Champion

 
East Sandanme #21
6–1
 
East Makushita #42
7–0
Champion

 
East Makushita #4
3–4
 
2015 East Makushita #8
5–2
 
East Makushita #4
4–3
 
West Makushita #3
4–3
 
West Makushita #2
3–4
 
West Makushita #5
5–2
 
East Makushita #1
5–2
 
2016 East Jūryō #12
8–7
 
West Jūryō #9
7–8
 
West Jūryō #10
8–7
 
East Jūryō #10
8–7
 
East Jūryō #9
8–7
 
West Jūryō #5
7–8
 
2017 West Jūryō #8
8–7
 
East Jūryō #8
8–7
 
West Jūryō #6
6–9
 
West Jūryō #9
8–7
 
East Jūryō #8
7–8
 
West Jūryō #8
8–7
 
2018 East Jūryō #6
7–8
 
West Jūryō #7
4–11
 
East Jūryō #14
11–4
 
East Jūryō #7
7–8
 
East Jūryō #8
7–8
 
West Jūryō #8
6–9
 
2019 West Jūryō #11
8–7
 
West Jūryō #6
6–9
 
East Jūryō #10
9–6
 
East Jūryō #6
13–2
Champion

 
East Maegashira #14
10–5
F
East Maegashira #7
6–9
 
2020 East Maegashira #12
6–9
 
East Maegashira #15
1–4–10
 
West Jūryō #7
Tournament Cancelled
0–0–0
West Jūryō #7
7–8
 
West Jūryō #8
7–8
 
East Jūryō #9
8–7
 
2021 East Jūryō #8
12–3
Champion

 
West Maegashira #14
9–6
 
East Maegashira #8
4–11
 
East Maegashira #15
8–7
 
West Maegashira #13
5–10
 
East Jūryō #1
9–6
 
2022 West Maegashira #16
6–9
 
West Jūryō #1
7–8
 
West Jūryō #2
10–5
 
West Maegashira #14
5–8–2[7]
 
West Maegashira #15
5–10
 
x
Record given as win-loss-absent    Top Division Champion Top Division Runner-up Retired Lower Divisions

Sanshō key: F=Fighting spirit; O=Outstanding performance; T=Technique     Also shown: =Kinboshi; P=Playoff(s)
Divisions: Makuuchi — Jūryō — Makushita — Sandanme — Jonidan — Jonokuchi

Makuuchi ranks: Yokozuna — Ōzeki — Sekiwake — Komusubi — Maegashira

See also

References

  1. ^ Morita, Hiro (25 September 2019). "Fall sumo tourney: a September to remember". NHK World. Retrieved 18 February 2020.
  2. ^ "Title chase now wide open". Japan Times. 20 September 2019. Retrieved 18 February 2020.
  3. ^ "Sumo: Takakeisho falls, Enho beats Goeido on Day 9 of New Year meet". Kyodo News. 20 January 2020. Retrieved 18 February 2020.
  4. ^ "Sumo: Hakuho labors to 5th victory, unbeaten in 4-way tie". The Mainichi. 12 March 2020. Retrieved 12 March 2020.
  5. ^ "Wins of Tsurugisho". Sumo Reference. Retrieved 18 February 2020.
  6. ^ "Tsurugisho Momotaro Rikishi Information". Sumo Reference. Retrieved 18 February 2020.
  7. ^ Withdrew on Day 13 due to COVID protocols


External links

  • Tsurugishō Momotarō's official biography (English) at the Grand Sumo Homepage
  • v
  • t
  • e
Active Makuuchi Wrestlers[1]
YokozunaŌzekiSekiwakeKomusubi

Mongolia Terunofuji

Japan Takakeishō
Japan Shōdai
Japan Mitakeumi

Japan Wakatakakage
Mongolia Hōshōryū
Japan Daieishō

Japan Abi
Mongolia Ichinojō
Mongolia Kiribayama

Maegashira #1Maegashira #2Maegashira #3Maegashira #4Maegashira #5

Japan Tobizaru
Japan Midorifuji

Japan Kotonowaka
Japan Meisei

Mongolia Tamawashi
Japan Ura

Japan Nishikigi
Japan Takayasu

Japan Takarafuji
Japan Sadanoumi

Maegashira #6Maegashira #7Maegashira #8Maegashira #9Maegashira #10

Japan Wakamotoharu
Japan Endō

Georgia (country) Tochinoshin
Japan Hokutofuji

Japan Myōgiryū
Japan Kotoeko

Japan Nishikifuji
Japan Takanoshō

Maegashira #11Maegashira #12Maegashira #13Maegashira #14Maegashira #15Maegashira #16

Japan Okinoumi
Japan Ryūden

Japan Ichiyamamoto
Japan Ōhō

Japan Terutsuyoshi
Japan Tsurugishō

Mongolia Mitoryū
Japan Hiradoumi


  1. ^ Grand Sumo Tournament Banzuke