Oleksiy Danilov

Ukrainian politician (born 1962)

Олексій ДаніловOleksiy Danilov September 2022 (cropped).jpgSecretary of the
National Security and Defense Council of Ukraine
Incumbent
Assumed office
3 October 2019PresidentVolodymyr ZelenskyPreceded byOleksandr Danylyuk Personal detailsBorn
Oleksiy Myacheslavovych Danilov

(1962-09-07) 7 September 1962 (age 60)
Krasnyi Luch, Luhansk Oblast, Ukrainian SSR, Soviet Union[1]Political partySocial Democratic Party of Ukraine (united)
Party of Free DemocratsOther political
affiliationsYulia Tymoshenko Bloc (2006–2007)EducationUniversity of Luhansk
East Ukrainian Volodymyr Dahl National University
Luhansk State University of Internal AffairsOccupationVeterinarian
Politician

Oleksiy Miacheslavovych Danilov (Ukrainian: Олексій Мячеславович Данілов; born 7 September 1962[2]) is a Ukrainian politician.[3] He is the current Secretary of the National Security and Defense Council (since 3 October 2019).[4]

Early life and early career

Danilov graduated in 1981 from the Starobilsk State Farm Technical School with a degree in veterinary medicine.[1] In 1981 he began working as a veterinary in a farm in Voroshilovgrad (currently Luhansk).[1] From 1983 to 1987, he worked as a veterinarian in Voroshilovgrad's park "1 May".[1] From 1987 to 1991 he worked as a private veterinarian.[1] From 1991 to 1994 he was engaged in private entrepreneurship.[1]

Political career

Danilov was Mayor of Luhansk from 1994 to 1997.[5] Aged 31 years, was the youngest mayor of Luhansk in the history of the city.[1]

In the 1998 Ukrainian parliamentary election Danilov unsuccessfully tried to win a parliamentary seat in electoral district 103 as an independent candidate.[6]

In 1999, Danilov graduated from the University of Luhansk as a licensed history teacher.[1] In 2000, Danilov received a master's degree in management from the East Ukrainian Volodymyr Dahl National University. In 2000, he also received a law degree from the Luhansk State University of Internal Affairs.[5]

In the early 2000s, Danilov was a member of the party Yabluko (that during his membership was renamed Party of Free Democrats).[1] In the 2002 Ukrainian parliamentary election he was again unsuccessful in his attempt to get elected to parliament on the party list of this party.[6]

In 2000, Danilov was an adviser to the parliamentary Committee on Industrial Policy and Entrepreneurship.[1] From October 2001 to February 2005, he founded the Luhansk Initiative and was its chairman. At the same time, he was as deputy director of the Institute for European Integration and Development (IEID).[7][1]

Danilov served as the Governor of Luhansk Oblast in 2005.[8][9]

Danilov was elected to the Verkhovna Rada in 2006 for the Yulia Tymoshenko Bloc.[7][1]

In the 2007 Ukrainian parliamentary election Danilov tried to get reelected to parliament for the Party of Free Democrats, but was again unsuccessful.[6] After leaving parliament he returned the IEID to his previous position of deputy director.[1]

Danilov rose to national prominence on the strength of appearances "on Ukraine's highly-rated national prime time talk show, where he takes on the country's oligarchs, illegal privatizations, the machinations Russia's fifth column in Ukraine, and "treasonous" votes in past parliaments."[10]

Danilov was Deputy Secretary of the National Security and Defense Council from 23 July to 3 October 2019.[11][12] Since 3 October 2019 he is the Secretary (deputy Chairman, President Volodymyr Zelensky is the formal chairman) of this board.[4][10]

On 24 January 2022, Danilov said that the movement of Russian troops near Ukraine's border was "not news" and "we don't see any grounds for statements about a full-scale offensive on our country."[13]. During the Russian invasion of Ukraine, Danilov urged men elegible for mobilisation to not "hide behind a woman's skirt"[14][15][16]

After the 2022 Crimean Bridge explosion Danilov posted a video of the burning bridge alongside a black-and-white clip of Marilyn Monroe singing "Happy Birthday, Mr. President" — a reference to Putin turning 70 the same day.[17][18]

Political views

In October 2021, Danilov stated that he believed that it would be better for Ukraine to be a presidential republic than a parliamentary-presidential one.[19] Danilov argued that it would only be "possible to make a leap forward" with a "responsible person who understands what she is going for."[19] Ukraine is a parliamentary-presidential republic.[20][19]

Family

Danilov is married to Lyudmyla Volodymyrovna Danilova (Peregudova).[1] The couple have four children and seven grandchildren.[1] His mother lives in Luhansk.[21] Has an older brother and nephew.

See also

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o "Veterinarian and history teacher: what is known about the new Secretary of the National Security and Defense Council Alexei Danilov". UNIAN (in Ukrainian). 3 October 2019. Retrieved 6 July 2020.
  2. ^ "Данілов Олексій Мячеславович". Verkhovna Rada (in Ukrainian). Retrieved 3 October 2019.
  3. ^ Interfax-Ukraine (23 July 2019). "Zelensky appoints deputy secretary of National Security and Defense Council". Kyiv Post. Retrieved 3 October 2019.
  4. ^ a b "Zelensky appoints new NSDC secretary". UNIAN. 3 October 2019. Retrieved 3 October 2019.
  5. ^ a b "Данілов Олексій Мячеславович". dovidka.com.ua. Retrieved 3 October 2019.
  6. ^ a b c "Electoral history of Oleksiy Myacheslavovych Danilov". Civil movement "Chesno" (in Ukrainian). Retrieved 6 July 2020.
  7. ^ a b "Zelensky appoints Danilov as Secretary of National Defense Council". 112 International. 3 October 2019. Retrieved 3 October 2019.
  8. ^ "Decree of the President of Ukraine № 178/2005". Office of the President of Ukraine (in Ukrainian). Retrieved 3 October 2019.
  9. ^ "Decree of the President of Ukraine № 1561/2005". Office of the President of Ukraine (in Ukrainian). Retrieved 3 October 2019.
  10. ^ a b Karatnycky, Adrian (31 March 2021). "Ukraine's unlikely new political heavyweight". Atlantic Council.
  11. ^ "Decree of the President of Ukraine № 551/2019". Office of the President of Ukraine (in Ukrainian). Retrieved 3 October 2019.
  12. ^ "Decree of the President of Ukraine № 732/2019". Office of the President of Ukraine (in Ukrainian). Retrieved 3 October 2019.
  13. ^ "Ukraine urges calm, saying situation 'under control' and Russian invasion not imminent". ABC. 25 January 2022.
  14. ^ "Нечего прятаться за женской юбкой и бежать из страны: Данилов о петиции по выезду мужчин".
  15. ^ "Прячутся за женской юбкой: Данилов призвал мужчин не бежать за границу". focus.ua. 3 August 2022.
  16. ^ "В СНБО жестко пристыдили мужчин за желание сбежать за границу во время войны". www.unian.net.
  17. ^ https://twitter.com/OleksiyDanilov/status/1578636142055870464[bare URL]
  18. ^ Specia, Megan (8 October 2022). "'Happy birthday, Mr. President': Ukrainians celebrate the bridge blast with memes". The New York Times.
  19. ^ a b c "I am for a tough presidential republic - Danilov". Ukrayinska Pravda (in Russian). 25 October 2021.
  20. ^ Kudelia, Serhiy (4 May 2018). "Presidential activism and government termination in dual-executive Ukraine". Post-Soviet Affairs. 34 (4): 246–261. doi:10.1080/1060586X.2018.1465251. S2CID 158492144.
  21. ^ Что мы сделали с матерью Алексея Данилова, retrieved 30 November 2021 – via YouTube

External links

  • Media related to Oleksiy Danilov at Wikimedia Commons
  • Oleksiy Danilov on Facebook
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