Vladimir Putin's meeting table

Unusually long table in the Kremlin
Vladimir Putin's meeting table
Putin and Macron meeting with a large table.jpg
Russian president Putin and French president Macron in 2022
DesignerOAK Furniture
Datec. 1996
Made inCantu, Lombardy, Italy
MaterialsBeech wood
Width6 m (20 ft)
CollectionKremlin
Table in use by President Putin in 2000

Vladimir Putin's meeting table is a white-topped oval beech table that was installed in the Kremlin in the late 1990s, during the presidency of Boris Yeltsin.[1] It is reported that the table is 6 metres (20 feet) long, made from a single sheet of beech wood, and supported on three hollowed wooden stands. It is lacquered white and is gold-plated on the side.[2]

OAK Furniture, a business from Cantù, Italy, has claimed to have made the table, as part of a deal furnishing parts of the Kremlin between 1995 and 1997. OAK has produced a picture of the table in a book published in 1999.[2] However, a Spanish retired cabinet maker says he made the table in c. 2005.[2]

History

In 2022, Russian President Vladimir Putin has used the table in meetings with world leaders, among others Emmanuel Macron, Olaf Scholz and António Guterres.[3][4][5] Putin was pictured seated at one end of a very long white meeting table, with the other participants seated far away from him at the other end. Putin has also been pictured attending similarly distanced meetings with his own officials at other long tables.[6] During the 2022 Russian invasion of Ukraine, the table became a subject of numerous internet memes.[7]

It has been speculated that Putin chooses to use the long table in an attempt to intimidate and to project an image of power, or for fear of contracting COVID-19.[3][8][9] Putin has been pictured attending meetings in close proximity with Chinese president Xi Jinping and Belarusian president Alexander Lukashenko in the same period.[10]

See also

References

  1. ^ "To Russia with love: vast Italian table in Kremlin turns heads". Reuters. 2022-02-15. Retrieved 2022-04-27.
  2. ^ a b c "Italian craftsman claims Putin's 'unique' oversized table". www.aljazeera.com. Retrieved 2022-04-27.
  3. ^ a b "Putin's massive table: powerplay or paranoia?". The Guardian. 2022-02-08. Retrieved 2022-04-27.
  4. ^ Saul, Derek. "Putin's Long Tables Explained: Why He Puts Some Leaders, Including Germany's Scholz, At An Extreme Distance". Forbes. Retrieved 2022-04-27.
  5. ^ "Putin breaks out the Kremlin's ridiculously long table to meet with the head of the UN". Business Insider. Retrieved 10 June 2022.
  6. ^ "Photos: Putin keeps his distance during meetings". uk.news.yahoo.com. Retrieved 2022-04-27.
  7. ^ "Putin's White Table in Macron Talks Sparks Endless Memes". The Moscow Times. 9 February 2022. Retrieved 28 April 2022.
  8. ^ "What Putin's very long table tells us about Russia's inner workings". NBC News. Retrieved 2022-04-27.
  9. ^ "Thumbelina Politics: a Seat at Putin's Table". artreview.com. Retrieved 2022-04-28.
  10. ^ "Xi and Putin urge Nato to rule out expansion as Ukraine tensions rise". The Guardian. 2022-02-04. Retrieved 2022-04-28.

External links

Media related to Vladimir Putin's meeting table at Wikimedia Commons

  • v
  • t
  • e
Political activities
Vladimir Putin
PresidencyDomestic policyForeign policyFamily
Public image
  • v
  • t
  • e
Kremlin Wall
and Towers
Administrative
buildings
Churches
Squares
and gardens
Monuments
Former
  • v
  • t
  • e
Overview
General
Prelude
Background
Foreign relations
Southern Ukraine
Eastern Ukraine
Kyiv
Northeastern Ukraine
Russian occupations
Ongoing
Previous
Strikes on military targets
Potentially related incidents
Other
General
Attacks on civilians
Attacks on prisoners of war
Legal cases
Reactions
States and
official entities
General
Ukraine
Russia
United States
Other countries
United Nations
International
organizations
Other
Public
Protests
Companies
Technology
Other
Impact
Effects
Human rights
Terms and phrases
Popular culture
Key people
Ukraine Ukrainians
Russia Russians
Other
  • Category
  • Commons
  • Meta-Wiki
Stub icon

This Russia-related article is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

  • v
  • t
  • e